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Just announced: a #genealogy conference for #Luxembourg research… and more!

If you missed out, the 2017 International German Genealogy Partnership conference was a great opportunity for Luxembourg researchers. I was lucky enough to get to speak on how to trace your family backwards from the United States to Luxembourg and on how to use Luxembourg's civil registration (vital records to us Americans!). Plus we got… Continue reading Just announced: a #genealogy conference for #Luxembourg research… and more!

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Resources

#Sale on a #Luxembourg #genealogy must-have!

A history of Luxembourg settlement in the United States and an index to the Luxemburger Gazette.... Luxembourgers in the New World is a must-have for American researchers looking to trace their Luxembourg roots. Even better, it's currently on sale. Check out the offerings from the Luxembourg American Cultural Society at https://www.ebay.com/itm/Luxembourgers-in-the-New-World-Vol-1-2/282753737153?epid=5336722&hash=item41d56fa1c1%3Ag%3ABJIAAOSwUYNaHuJ9.

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What does “dimissiorales” mean?

Another stumper from the marriage card index... Do you know what "dimissiorales" means? It's actually a transcription error for "dimissorales," a German word. The English translation is a dimissorial letter, a letter given to someone by their local clergy to permit baptism, burial or marriage to be celebrated outside their native church. According to Wikipedia, this… Continue reading What does “dimissiorales” mean?

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What does “dictus” mean in #Luxembourg genealogy?

Nicolas Reutter married in 1717... as Nicolas Reutter dictus Mueller. What does "dictus" mean? There's a basic answer. The basic answer: the Latin word "dictus" translates as "called" or "known as." So, Nicolas Reutter was also called Nicolas Mueller. Of course, the question is why?  I don't have a good answer, but I can pose two… Continue reading What does “dictus” mean in #Luxembourg genealogy?