Want to learn more? Chat session opportunity!

Hi all!

I’ve had a number of requests for chances to learn more about Luxembourg genealogy, so I’ve decided to try something new. This Friday, April 14th, 2017 at 7 pm Eastern, I’m going to be running a free half hour question and answer chat session on Google Hangouts. Bring your Luxembourg and Luxembourg American research questions, and I’ll do my best to answer them.

How do you sign up? Use the contact form below to provide me with your name, email address and any comments. I’ll email out an invitation for the hangout.  Max registration will be 15.

Hope you can come!

Posted in Uncategorized

Translation Tip: What is this word?

date

The second word is annee (forgive the missing accent)… But what’s the first?

6 eme.  Sixth.

How do I know? Eme is the equivalent of the English, th. It usually follows dates.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tuesday’s Tip: What does seeing “Dutch” on a Luxembourger record mean?

I just had a great question from a client working on a Luxembourger project: what does seeing “Dutch” on a Luxembourger record mean?

It’s usually a mistake. Since Luxembourgish, the language spoken by most Luxembourgers, is considered a German dialect, Luxembourgers were often called “Deutch” (German) by outsiders. This got misheard by an English speaker and recorded as “Dutch.” So, chances are high it doesn’t mean much.

Posted in How to | Tagged | 1 Comment

Church Record Sunday: 5 Hints for Navigating Luxembourg’s Church Records

My client project has crossed back into the eighteenth century – and I’m spending time delving into church records.

Here are five hints to make your search a little easier:

  1. Most records are in Latin.
  2. Most parishes have underlined the last name of the person described in the record. In some cases, both the last name and child’s first name will be underlined.
  3. The use record will generally begin with “die” to indicate date.
  4. 8bre means October; 9bre means November.
  5. If you’re looking for baptismal records, look for the word “filia” (to indicate girl) or “filius” (boy).
Posted in How to | Leave a comment

Tuesday’s tip: take a second look at your ancestry DNA results

Ancestry DNA has jut added a new feature, called Genetic Communities.

Based on DNA and family trees, it allows you to view the path your ancestor might have taken from Europe to the United States…

And one of those communities includes Luxembourgers.

If it’s shown up in your results, please let me know. I’m curious to hear accurate it was or was not!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Surname Saturday: The Parentage of Anne Marie (Reuter) Hintgen

When the enumerator recorded Anne Marie Hintgen and her three sons on Wahpeton’s 1880 census, he stated that she was born in Germany.[1] He erred. Although she likely spoke German, Anne was a native of Luxembourg – and the daughter of a large Luxembourg family.

Born about in Sennigen, Luxembourg, Anne Marie Reuter was the oldest known daughter of Jean and Catherine (Danckoff) Reuter.[2] Jean was born about 1795 and was a native of Helmdange, Luxembourg.[3] Catherine was born in Sennigen about five years later.[4] The couple married in Niederanven on 3 June 1823.[5]

By 1843, the family numbered six children.[6] Anne Marie was living in Niederanven, with another family.[7] Still living at home in Helmdange were Marguerite, age seventeen; Elisabeth, age seven; Anne, age five; Pierre, age three; and Romain, age four months.[8]

Although Anne Marie left for the United States in 1862, at least some of her family remained in Helmdange. By the 1861 census, Jean had died.[9] Marguerite had married Adam Jacqueman and shared a household with her husband and children, her mother Catherine, and her brothers Pierre and Romain.  Catherine would pass away in 1871.[10]

Knowing Anne is not the daughter of a German family but instead Luxembourg opens the possibility of tracing her roots. Digging through the records of Helmdange and Sennigen should identify the parents of Catherine and Jean – and taking their roots back to Luxembourg or even Switzerland….

[1] 1880 U.S. census, Richland County, North Dakota, population schedule, Wahpeton, p. 2, enumeration district (ed) 55, dwelling 17, family 17, Mary Hingtgen household; databases and images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/6742/4240106-00309/48911607?backurl=https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/21500437/person/1131770894/facts/citation/74376041850/edit/record: accessed 22 March 2017).

[2] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1843, commune of Niederanven, section of Oberanven, Jean Hansen household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G97B-87BG?mode=g&i=221&wc=M5LR-C68%3A345955501%2C345863501&cc=2037957 : accessed 22 March 2017).

[3] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1843, commune of Lorentzweiler, section of Helmdange, Jean Reiter household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-VFH1?mode=g&cc=2037957: accessed 22 March 2017).

[4] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1843, commune of Lorentzweiler, section of Helmdange, Jean Reiter household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-VFH1?mode=g&cc=2037957: accessed 22 March 2017).

[5] Niederanven, Luxembourg, civil registration, no. 6 (issued 1823), Reuter- Danckoff marriage; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11583-133506-87?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-PTL:130132201,130239901 : accessed 22 March 2017).

[6] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1843, commune of Lorentzweiler, section of Helmdange, Jean Reiter household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-VFH1?mode=g&cc=2037957: accessed 22 March 2017).

[7] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1843, commune of Niederanven, section of Oberanven, Jean Hansen household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G97B-87BG?mode=g&i=221&wc=M5LR-C68%3A345955501%2C345863501&cc=2037957 : accessed 22 March 2017).

[8] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1843, commune of Lorentzweiler, section of Helmdange, Jean Reiter household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-VFH1?mode=g&cc=2037957: accessed 22 March 2017).

[9] Luxembourg, Bulletin de Population pour 1861, commune of Lorentzweiler, section of Helmdange, Adam Jacqueman household ; images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8971-C9CQ-S?mode=g&i=130&wc=M5G9-FM9%3A345941101%2C345867101&cc=2037957 : accessed 22 March 2017).

[10] Lorentzweiler, Luxembourg, civil registration, no. 43 (issued 1871), Catherine Danckoff death; images, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/9916/MM9.3.1_2FTH-267-12054-19691-18?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fsearch%2fdb.aspx%3fdbid%3d9916%26path%3d&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnBrowsing#?imageId=MM9.3.1_2FTH-267-12667-21894-55: accessed 22 March 2017).

Posted in surname history | Tagged | Leave a comment

Those Places Thursday: Access the Minnesota State Census for Free

I’m currently trying to fill in some gaps in a client’s family tree – and made a helpful discovery. If you want to your Luxembourg ancestor using the Minnesota state census, you don’t have to pay for Ancestry. The Minnesota State Historical Society has made the enumerations accessible for free. To find out how to access them, visit their website.

Posted in How to, Resources | Tagged | Leave a comment