Luxembourg records: how do I figure out when my ancestors married?

  • I had birth dates for my Luxembourg-American ancestors from their American records. (and birth locations, thanks to Luxembourg-American family historians who did the work when their children and grandchildren were still living.)
  • I had their parents’ names and years of birth from their children’s birth certificates.
  • I checked the birth records for the parent’s year of birth. No record.
  • What do I do now?

I found myself in just this situation recently.  From previous experience, I know that the parents’ marriage record will help me find clues, including if he – as was likely – was born in another town. However, I don’t know when they married.

The Luxembourg Civil Registration on FamilySearch isn’t “officially” indexed. But don’t give up yet. If you know where the child was born, you’re likely studying records in the commune where the parents were married. Choose books based on the dates. “Naissances” is births. Indices appear at the end of (almost) every year within a book.

Start by checking for the birth records to determine when their oldest child was born. Since I had an approximate birth year for the father, I assumed his marriage would have taken place about age 20. I checked birth records from 1816 on and found no children until 1826. That told me that their oldest child was likely born in 1826, and the marriage should have taken place about that time.

Since I now had a range of years, 1816 to 1826, I went to marriage records and worked my way  backwards. I found my ancestor’s record in 1823, with a ton of information. I can’t wait for the next step!

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About Bryna O'Sullivan

A Connecticut-based professional genealogist, I love working with beginners of all backgrounds. I also do specialty research in Connecticut and Luxembourg-American genealogy.
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