Category Archives: How to

Navigating notarial records… The beginning

Most Luxembourg researchers I know haven’t used notarial records. Why? They don’t know what notarial records are. (If you fall into that category, read the blog post here.) They don’t know where to look for the collection of notarial records … Continue reading

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Tuesday’s Tip: What does seeing “Dutch” on a Luxembourger record mean?

I just had a great question from a client working on a Luxembourger project: what does seeing “Dutch” on a Luxembourger record mean? It’s usually a mistake. Since Luxembourgish, the language spoken by most Luxembourgers, is considered a German dialect, … Continue reading

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Church Record Sunday: 5 Hints for Navigating Luxembourg’s Church Records

My client project has crossed back into the eighteenth century – and I’m spending time delving into church records. Here are five hints to make your search a little easier: Most records are in Latin. Most parishes have underlined the … Continue reading

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Those Places Thursday: Access the Minnesota State Census for Free

I’m currently trying to fill in some gaps in a client’s family tree – and made a helpful discovery. If you want to your Luxembourg ancestor using the Minnesota state census, you don’t have to pay for Ancestry. The Minnesota … Continue reading

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Research tip: save time by using the census to find vital records dates

I’ve been reading census enumerations . Why? Because it’s actually faster than turning page after page in the vital records books… A client doesn’t know when their ancestor died. We could have started with theĀ marriage of the ancestor’s daughter, the … Continue reading

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Who is that second family living in my ancestor’s house?

The 1843 Luxembourg census lists each house on a separate sheet, but not each household. The enumeration for the home of Jean Reuter actually lists two families. One is headed by Jean; the other is headed by a man named … Continue reading

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Surname Saturday: use the 1855 census to find exact relationships

Wondering if the child in the house is a niece, nephew, cousin or more? Check out the 1855 Luxembourg census. Under “state or profession,” the enumerator not only listed occupation but also the family relationship of anyone not working. One … Continue reading

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