Category Archives: Resources

Those Places Thursday: Access the Minnesota State Census for Free

I’m currently trying to fill in some gaps in a client’s family tree – and made a helpful discovery. If you want to your Luxembourg ancestor using the Minnesota state census, you don’t have to pay for Ancestry. The Minnesota … Continue reading

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Did your ancestor immigrate from Luxembourg between 1876 and 1900?

AnLux has placed a publication online that could help your research. Written in French, it’s called Luxembourg Emigrants and Remigrants, 1876 -1900. It draws from the population movement registers stored at AnLux to create a detailed list of who emigrated … Continue reading

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5 reasons to use the Luxembourg census

We don’t use the Luxembourg census often enough… It’s not indexed, so why bother? It lists birth places. The U.S. census only lists states, but the Luxembourg census lists towns. Can’t figure out where your ancestor is born but know … Continue reading

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Wellenstein Birth Records: Those Places Thursday

One of the most difficult parts about Luxembourg research is the lack of indexing for digital databases. For most kinds of research, you need to know the town and the year to locate a record. However, that’s not the case … Continue reading

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Using probate files to fill in personal details: Those Places Thursday

Iowa probate files are now on Ancestry, providing¬† a goldmine of information for Luxembourg researchers. The area around St Donates was a popular settlement for Luxembourger families beginning around the time of the American Civil War. Many of the immigrant … Continue reading

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Tuesday’s Tip: Repatriation Documents Identify Birth Location

Bertha Ryder believed she had lost her citizenship. Even though she was ethnically Luxembourger, she was born in the United States and thus was an American citizen by birth. At least until she had married Ryder, a native of Canada. … Continue reading

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What can I learn from the 1851 census of Luxembourg?: Tuesday’s Tip

    Why employ the census to research Luxembourger ancestors? Some of the commonly cited reasons might be the accessibility of the source, the variety of information contained within, and the ability to trace the family over time. Yet, there … Continue reading

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